Find your VK Shire, activators!

When out activating a SOTA summit or a VKFF park you may be asked “What shire are you in“? Far from home without an encyclopædic knowledge of shire boundaries this can be difficult to answer. One may have passed a shire sign on the way to the activation, but with all the council amalgamations and name changes not even these can be relied upon.

So, a more modern method of identifying the shire is needed.
Luckily there are online resources that help identify the shire you are in.
All you need to know is your location.
Recipes for each state and territory follow (where available).

Harden Shire Yass Valley Council sign Bobborra Road between Binalong and Galong

Council signs can’t always be relied upon: Harden is merging into Hilltops Shire

NSW

Go to this web site: http://www.olg.nsw.gov.au/find-my-council
There is a text box labelled:  Address (required)
Sure, you can type in your street address.
More usefully, you can put in a GPS coordinate!
The site will then give you the name of your shire. The format accepted is latitude then comma then longitude in decimal degrees. The latitude will be a negative number for VK. Look these up with a mobile phone app such as GP Status on Android or on SOTAwatch for the summit you’re activating.

VIC

Go to this web site: https://knowyourcouncil.vic.gov.au
There is a search box that will accept your suburb. Unfortunately it will not accept a GPS coordinate. Instead use the Use my location link and when prompted ALLOW access to your location on your mobile device.

QLD

No online lookup found. Clickable overview map here:
http://www.bettercouncils.net.au/find-your-council

SA

Go to this web site: http://www.lga.sa.gov.au/councils
Enter your suburb to look up the shire.

TAS

No online lookup. Listing of shires by postcode and town name here:
http://www.lgat.tas.gov.au/webdata/resources/files/Localities_By_Council_0905.pdf

WA

Go to this web site: http://walga.asn.au/
Enter your suburb to look up the shire.

NT

No online lookup found. Rough maps here:
https://nt.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0018/206244/council-boundaries-basic-map.pdf

ACT

All one shire with code AC1.


Shire Code

Once you have the name of the shire, the code can be found from the spreadsheet in the Files section of the VK Shires facebook page here:
https://www.facebook.com/groups/544877775683852/files/

Look for the “vk shires” file with the .xls type. The spreadsheet has tabs for each state containing all of the shires and their three character codes. It may not be possible to read this file on a mobile device, so in that case share the load and ask the chaser to do it for you from their nice warm shack!


Spotting

Another way to find the shire code is from the ParksnPeaks site. You can self-spot for the shire you’re activating and in the process pull in all those Shires chasers. Just launch:
http://www.parksnpeaks.org/addSpot.php

Choose VK Shires as the class of activation
then in SubCat choose your state and after pressing Next you’ll be in the Shires Spot page. Choose the name of your shire from the list under Activating Shire then put in your call and QRG. Press Next and the spot will be launched into cyberspace.
You’ll end up at the VK Shires Status page with your activation listed at the top. Your shire code can be read from the details of the activation. This is probably quicker than downloading and looking up the spreadsheet!

So, go out and activate a shire the next time you activate for SOTA or VKFF!
And you might start asking chasers “What shire are you in?”

Gerard VK2IO activating Mt Tarana VK2/CT-008

Mountain Goat on Mt Tarana 27 Jun 2016

The tenth and final summit of my “Goat or Bust” trip in the NSW Central Tablelands was Mt Tarana VK2/CT-008 located midway between Lithgow and Bathurst. There were enough SOTA activation points in this summit to put me past the magic one thousand mark so the yearning to complete this one was high.

160627MtTaranaVK2IOa

Gerard VK2IO activating Mt Tarana VK2/CT-008

Nick VK2AOH had scouted out Mt Tarana a few times as access is via private property on all sides. He’d made contact with some of the owners. When one door closed he found a way to open another one. With some skilful negotiating with one property owner he organised access and a meeting time was arranged. We met the owner who promised that as long as we tippy-toed across the adjacent property there would be no issue. So, we set upon our journey to approach the summit from the northern side. We crossed the first property, and to our great surprise, the landowner of the second property was lying in wait for us. Nick’s negotiating skills would be put to the test once again – and he came right through. There were some anxious moments, but thankfully the expedition was allowed to proceed.

160627MtTaranaBase

Nick VK2AOH at the base of the northern side of Mt Tarana

Following the fence line, up and up we went climbing into snowy ground. Through the boundary gate a wide clearing was found on the edge of a forest. We followed the clearing and it seemed to be leading us directly toward the summit. After a couple of kilometres the track looped back around and it was then apparent that its purpose was more as a firebreak. Jumping the fence we were in another forest and there was no track. We followed the GPS and it was only a few hundred metres to the summit where the trig point was easily found. It had been snowing on and off during the climb and the ground was carpeted with snow. It certainly looked a picture!

160627MtTaranaGate

Gate into the wide clearing that leads to Mt Tarana

After a few happy snaps I sent off an advisory spot to SOTAwatch giving 15 minutes notice of our activation. The ZS6BKW antenna was set up using the trig point as a vertical support for the 10m squid pole. A patch of ground that was clear of snow was picked for the radio shack. It was about 5m away from the trig point. The KX3 was set up on a ground sheet there and set for 15 Watts output.

Putting out a call on 40m CW the response was an instant pile-up. It was late on a Monday morning and not quite what I was expecting. I’m not sure whether it was the mountain or the operator who was in high demand. The mountain had only been activated once before by Nick so it was certainly a rarity. We hoped to change that and give everyone an opportunity to get this summit in their logs.

160627MtTaranaShack

Gerard VK2IO in the “shack” on Mt Tarana

Working through the callers there was Rick VK4RF and VK4HA then Ron VK3AFW. The fourth caller was Steve VK7CW and I was overjoyed making this contact as it made me an official Mountain Goat. I expressed my excitement in CW though it may have been more easily conveyed on SSB. Total radio time to achieve Goathood – less than three minutes!

A further five CW contacts were made and then I switched to SSB where more chasers were waiting. There was no need of a spot straight away as the pile-up would be overwhelming. Nev VK5WG was the first station worked on SSB. A stream of stations followed and the first SSB spot was put up 7 minutes later. Contacts on SSB continued for half an hour with 19 stations logged including ZL2ATH as a summit-to-summit. Obviously conditions were good as you don’t often make a QRP to QRP contact with New Zealand at midday on 40m!

160627MtTaranaVK2AOH

Nick VK2AOH in the “shack” at Mt Tarana

Nick jumped on the radio, or rather, swapped in his own KX3 customised just the way he likes it. He worked 40m CW for half an hour before switching to SSB. Five contacts were made using just 5 Watts so it seems that all the chasers were exhausted. Having seen a spot from Mike VK6MB I was keen to try 20m SSB.

160627MtTaranaTrig

Gerard VK2IO at Mt Tarana trig point

My KX3 was swapped in again and I started calling on 20m. Band conditions were poor and only Paul VK5PAS was worked with my signal marginal to him. After 10 minutes with no callbacks it was time to go QRT. Before shutting down Nick and I took turns leaving the activation zone and working the other on 2m FM. That way we could claim the chaser points for working the hill.

The wind was certainly a lazy one and we were very happy to end the activation and warm up on the walk back. Total time on the summit was an hour and three-quarters. The low cloud that obscured the view on the ascent had cleared so some more distant views were possible, filtered by tall trees. Light snow was still falling at times, very unusual for the middle of the day.

160627MtTaranaValleyView

Valley views on the descent from Mt Tarana

It was great to make Mountain Goat on Mt Tarana. It has taken 205 summit activations lasting 2.5 years in 25 SOTA regions over 8 countries. What a journey!

Thank you to Nick VK2AOH for company on this activation, sorting out the route and organising access to Mt Tarana.
Thanks to all the chasers for coming out of the woodwork on a weekday and making the activation a success. This was the coldest of the ten activations over the long weekend and also the most exciting for me!

Log

Date:27/Jun/2016 Summit:VK2/CT-008 (Mount Tarana) Call Used:VK2IO/P Points: 8 Bonus: 3

Time Call Band Mode Notes
01:30z VK4RF 7MHz CW
01:30z VK4HA 7MHz CW
01:31z VK3AFW 7MHz CW
01:32z VK7CW 7MHz CW YAY! Now a Mountain Goat!
01:34z VK3CAT 7MHz CW
01:36z VK3PF 7MHz CW
01:38z ZL1BYZ 7MHz CW
01:39z VK3BYD/P 7MHz CW
01:41z VK5IS 7MHz CW
01:48z VK5WG 7MHz SSB
01:49z VK3LED 7MHz SSB
01:49z VK5EE 7MHz SSB
01:50z VK2NIJ/4 7MHz SSB
01:51z VK5FANA 7MHz SSB
01:52z VK3PF 7MHz SSB
01:54z VK2WOW 7MHz SSB
01:57z VK4HNS/P 7MHz SSB
02:02z VK3GGG 7MHz SSB
02:02z VK3PMG 7MHz SSB
02:02z VK3FLCS 7MHz SSB
02:03z VK3SQ 7MHz SSB
02:03z VK2YW/M 7MHz SSB
02:06z VK2TH 7MHz SSB
02:10z ZL2ATH 7MHz SSB
02:12z VK2ZVG 7MHz SSB
02:13z VK4RF 7MHz SSB
02:13z VK4HA 7MHz SSB
02:14z VK6JON/7 7MHz SSB
02:53z VK5PAS 14MHz SSB
03:05z VK2AOH/P 144MHz FM
160413LaneCoveNPsign

Lane Cove NP – 12 Apr 2016

160413LaneCoveNPsignA rainy sort of day and I was in the area so decided to activate the Lane Cove National Park VKFF-0281. The park is 15km north of Sydney city and runs along the Lane Cove River through around 10 suburbs. It is usually only heard about when it catches fire and with houses backing right up to the park that does initiate a big response. The park is also along the route of the Great North Walk.

160413LaneCoveNPmapI had visited this park several times before but still had not completely explored it. This time I had to approach it in a different way being the location for a WWFF activation. From aerial maps I had identified a couple of spots around the perimeter of the park and a spot near one of the the entrances. As it turned out, one perimeter spot on Fiddens Wharf Rd could not be accessed by car as it was gated and the other one at the end of Bradfield Rd was open but restricted to service vehicles. See map here. So I ended up driving right around and going through the DeBurghs Bridge entrance to the spot near there on Riverside Drive. The road had been narrowed down to an access track and the available parking spot was not sufficiently roomy for an activation. So, I proceeded along the road and checked out an area previously unvisited called Tunks Hill picnic area. Here I found a huge and almost empty carpark with lots of green space around. This seemed ideal so I parked at (-33.780747,151.135404), locator QF56NF.

160413LaneCoveNPsiteIt had been moderately dry, but of course as I set up my antenna the heavens opened. The squid pole was lashed to the back antenna on the car and the far ends of the ZS6BKW attached to a tree and a picnic shelter. The LDG antenna tuner was set up under the car to keep it dry. One thought was that I could transfer operation to a picnic shelter without shifting the antenna, but it turned out to be too rainy and I settled in to make some contacts from the shelter of the car.

160413LaneCoveNPantIt was just after 2pm and first contact was with Warren ZL2AJ on SOTA ZL1/BP-201 on 20m. I moved to 40m and started calling and the first contact there was a park-to-park with Shane VK2TJF in the Barrington Tops at VKFF-0017. Four contacts later another P2P with David VK5KC/3 in Murray-sunset NP VKFF-0373. Propagation was pretty good and I was able to sustain contacts on 40m including with VK5. Thankfully noise was low even though I was 50m from a business premises and 200m from a main road. I was also 200m from EHT powerlines – you can see them in the aerial view.

160413LaneCoveNPtunerMy only CW contact was on 20m with Ian VK5CZ at Maurice Hill VK5/NE-049. Occupied 40m until 4:40pm during which a surprise P2P contact with Clive ZL4CJR in Fiordland NP ZLFF-0004 was made and then I switched to 20m. There were only four contacts on 20m as there was no DX opening. On 40m a further P2P, this time with Rob VK4AAC/3 in Mt Granya State Park VKFF-0767. Being close to 5pm and with the prospect of battling the Sydney traffic, I packed up in order to escape the park well ahead of the 6pm closing time. As I drove out, it was still raining lightly and I was happy to have 51 contacts in the log, especially for a Tuesday.

Equipment

  • Yaesu FT100D transceiver @ 80W
  • LDG Z100 tuner
  • ZS6BKW antenna on 9m squid pole oriented WNW-ESE

Log

ZL2AJ, VK2TJF/P, VK3MRH, VK4RF, VK4HA, VK5KC/3, VK2GAZ, VK2XXM, VK5PAS, VK3PF, VK3MEG, VK5FANA, VK3NBL, VK5FMID, VK3GGG, VK3UH, VK4DD, VK5LG, VK4ARW, VK2NP, VK2FSAV, VK2HBG, VK2AIF, VK2SK, VK2IZZ, VK2MKE, VK2FGAS, VK5KDK, VK2UBQ/M, VK2FABJ, VK2HHA, VK3MCK, VK3ZMD, VK3FD/M, VK2JAZ, VK5JK, VK5CZ, VK4WJW, ZL4CJR/P, VK2QA, VK3HSB, VK2NWB, VK3TJK, VK5GJ, VK6WE/2, VK3OY, VK4RF, VK4HA, VK6MB, VK4AAC/3, VK5PCM.

Thanks to all those who made contact!

Mt Royal NP for Field Day and SOTA 19-20 Mar 2016

A triple-header for the weekend with the John Moyle Memorial Field Day contest, WWFF at Mt Royal National Park VKFF-0362 and SOTA from two summits within the park.

VK2/HU-024 810m 4pts QF57PS in Mt Royal NP VKFF-0362

Headed first to the VK2/HU-024 summit which is just outside the southern edge of the park by a matter of metres. The activation zone to the NE is well within the park and happens to lie along Mt Royal Rd and conveniently there is a cleared space to the side of the road suitable for camping and operating from. Note that not all maps show the correct location of the park boundary or of Mt Royal Rd near the summit. SIX maps and the OzTopo GPS map V7 are OK. I activated from (-32.24473,151.28366) marked on the map with a red “X”. The park boundary and the location of the summit are also shown. There would be an elevation difference of a few metres at most between the summit and the activated location.160319VK2HU-024map

The John Moyle is a 24 hour contest starting at 0100z (noon). I arrived at about 12:45pm and walked around the area with my GPS to find the summit and check for the exact park boundary. Once confirmed I started setting up. Weather was warm with clear blue skies and no wind so a perfect day to be out and activating. A 3m metal pole at the side of the road provided a perfect mount for lashing my squid pole. I was able to raise up the base of my squid pole by 1.5m to increase the effective height of the antenna. First contact in the log was at 1:12pm, a S2S with Tony VK1VIC at Mt Ginini. Normally I use a paper log but for contests I just about always use a computer, and so it was for this contest. Well over an hour was spent working through the stations on 40m SSB and then there was a spell on CW. 40 minutes there netted 9 contacts so the pace was leisurely. I used my KX3 and had it wound up to the full 15W output. Antenna was the usual ZS6BKW inverted-Vee with the apex at nearly 10m off the ground and oriented NW-SE. To obtain this orientation, the antenna crossed the road, but with the lowest point being at about 8m it wasn’t going to be a traffic hazard!

A new three hour block had started so I could rework stations again so back to 40m SSB starting out with 3 S2S contacts. Then hunting and pecking through all the stations calling CQ for half an hour then started calling on my own frequency. The band was pretty crowded but there were still slots available. This kept me busy for another half an hour before it was time to give 20m a go. It was pretty quiet on there with only 2 stations calling from VK6. Maybe I had missed all the action. So back to 40m with the odd listen on 80m. A car full of locals stopped for a chat and find out what I was up to. The road does not go through anywhere so there was less than one car per hour going past. I mentioned my intention to scale Mt Royal and was warned about the presence of tiger snakes.

Nearing 7pm I decided to have a break from contesting and set up the tent. This was pitched next to the metal pole as the amount of free antenna feedline was limited. My operating chair was moved inside the tent and used as an operating table. After a 40 minute break I was making contacts again – still on 40m SSB. After less than 15 minutes I switched to 80m SSB where there was a lot more action. I was able to work stations in VK1, VK2, VK3 and VK4 mainly by calling CQ.

160319VK2HU-024ant

Antenna at VK2/HU-024

Operating from inside the tent was very nice as it kept off the cool breeze, and it really did cool down quite a lot after sunset. The evening was spent operating on 80m and 40m. There was a dearth of stations on CW, just weak rapid fire stations operating in another contest. I was surprised at the lack of activity. I was keen to make a 6m contact as there had been no response to earlier calls. I made a contact with the Blue Mountains radio club station VK2HZ on 80m and asked them to try 6m. They said their 6m operators were in bed – it was only 10:15pm. Still, they were happy to try for a contact on their wire antenna. Unfortunately it was a no-go as they were only just audible to me and I had a fraction of their transmitter power. it would have to be left until morning.

160319VK2HU-024night

Night time shack at VK2/HU-024

There were still plenty of stations about on 80m and a few on 40m so I kept going. Conscious of my plans for Sunday I decided to turn in at 12:45am when things became a bit quiet on the bands. It was now just CQ callers that I had worked before so a good time to cut it short. I would need all my strength and alertness for Mt Royal!

In the morning I awoke to find it already quite light. My beanie had slipped over my eyes and kept things dark and the lack of light had allowed me to sleep more than expected. It was after 7am and weather was still nice, though overcast and a little crisp. I was back on the radio at 7:45am for a short stint until 8:30am. I was able to find VK2HZ again on 80m and arrange for a 6m contact with their VHF team. This time it was successful over a distance of 183km as they were using a beam rather than a wire antenna. I also was able to just hear a station in Bathurst, but they weren’t able to hear me. The other contacts I made in the morning were on 40m and I found 80m full of ragchewers and nets.

Mt Royal VK2/HU-007 1174m 6pts QF57PT in Mt Royal NP VKFF-0362

Packing up the camp site, shack and antenna occupied an hour and then it was off to the next summit. Driving up Mt Royal road one passes through the Youngville campground area after 5km at (-32.1995,151.3094). It would make a good base if one wanted to stay a few days and operate from the park. Continuing on 3km one reaches a Y intersection with a picnic area directly ahead at (-32.1823,151.3156). At 850m elevation this is the starting point for the walk to Mt Royal VK2/HU-007. A single sheltered picnic table and a park sign marks this location.

The walk starts immediately behind the picnic table and follows the ridge line all the way to the top. There is not just one clearly defined track but a series of parallel tracks that weave in and out from each other. The gradient is steep most of the way, around 2 in 5 so it is not for the faint hearted or infirm. The elevation is 320m over 2km so its a good idea to take breaks along the way. I did not need to climb very far before entering low cloud though the visibility was still fine for following the trail. There are various rock piles along the way providing reassurance that you’re on the right track. Just after half way up there is a rocky outcrop and while it would appear attractive to skirt around it, the best way is to scramble up over it. Further up after an open area one comes to a wall of foliage with seemingly no way to get through. There is a track on the right side to duck and weave around the trees which seemed to be the best approach. I only discovered this on the way back!

The rest of the way up has quite a dense wooden canopy with some sections having very little headroom. Near the top there is a faux summit that one can skirt around to the left. One must keep going past here another few hundred metres to reach the destination. The summit holds a trig station with Royal stamped in the vane and is covered with tall spindly trees. The tracks around the trig point are quite well trodden probably due to the presence of a geocache nearby. On the trig point cairn there is a log book with a large rock sitting on it providing little in the way of disguise.

160320VK2HU-007station

Station at Mt Royal VK2/HU-007

The tree cover near the trig point is quite low so rather than set up on the trig point itself, I set up my squid pole attached to a tree nearby. The antenna wire was woven around some trees and branches and with the dropoff the ends of the antenna were only about 2m off the ground. The usual ZS6BKW was used on the 8m squid pole with the antenna apex at about 7m off the deck. It had taken 1.5 hours to reach the summit and set up so there was still half an hour left until the close of the John Moyle contest at 12 noon. Again I concentrated on 40m SSB and in the time available I was able to snag 8 more contacts. At that point the computer log was closed off and I reverted to the paper log.

At contest end I was able to start spotting on SOTAwatch and the first was for 40m CW. Conditions were certainly poor as there were only 2 contacts. After 3 summit-to-summits on SSB I went to 30m CW and made 2 more contacts, one of those being a S2S with Ron VK3AFW. Then I went through 20m CW with no contacts then chased JL1NIE unsuccessfully on 15m CW. On 20m SSB I did make four contacts. There was a successful S2S with JF1NDT/1 on 12m CW then on 15m SSB one contact with a JA and nothing on 30m SSB. Finally I ended up on 40m SSB for a bunch of contacts including two CW contacts on 7090, one a S2S with Tony VK3CAT.

160320VK2HU-007shack

Shack at Mt Royal with PC for contest logging

Once the callers ran out I stayed around for a bit on the summit before packing up and departing about 3pm. Mobile coverage on the summit was pretty good on the Telstra network though there were dropouts. For example, I missed a spot from VK2QR by 15 mins and so did not get the S2S. The signal was up to 3 bars on the phone if positioned in a certain spot, but at other times there was no data. Sitting it just off the ground the signal was coming and going.

160320VK2HU-007viewW

View looking west just down from the Mt Royal summit

The return journey was a lot quicker than the climb as the better tracks to take were more obvious and there was a lot less huffing and puffing. I did not need to descend very far before the cloud cleared allowing some visibility of the valleys below. It would certainly be a spectacular spot on a clear day.

Highlights

  • 2 SOTA summits and 1 park qualified
  • 242 contacts including 20 CW contacts
  • 21 park-to-park contacts
  • 15 summit-to-summit contacts
  • no tiger snakes!

 

Japan’s summits/parks for the foreign traveller/skier

Here’s a compilation of SOTA and WWFF locations in Japan accessible to the tourist. It will be updated periodically. Any contributions are welcome!

Nagano region (JA0) – Nozawa Onsen ski resort

Mt Kenashi JA/NA-107 1650m 10 pts
Access: Summer SE on route 502 from Nozawaonsen
Winter: From Nozawaonsen, (A)Nagasaka Gondola, (D)Yamabiko 2nd, ski down (2)Yamabiko-B or (3)Yamabiko-C to (C)Yamabiko, take (C)Yamabiko to top. Trail map
Also note the eastern half of the AZ is in the Joshinetsu Kogen NP (JAFF-0013).

Nagano region (JA0) – Shiga Kogen ski resort

JA/NA-069 Yakebitaiyama 2010m 10 pts – in Joshinetsu Kogen NP (JAFF-0013)
Access: Summer: footpath to summit from Yamanouchi town
Winter: Yakebitaiyama ski area, take (36) to the top. Trail map

JA/NA-045 Yokoteyama 2307m 10pts – in Joshinetsu Kogen NP (JAFF-0013)
Access: Summer: route 292 then track to summit
Winter: Yokoteyama ski area, take (67) or (68), then (69), then (70) to top. Trail map

Tokyo area (JA1) including Kanagawa

JA/TK-012 Usukiyama 842m 4 points

Access: via 2km track from Hinohara Hwy 33 past Usuki shrine.
Closest station Musashi Itsukaichi on the Itsukaichi line.

JA/KN-022 Shiroyama 375m 1 point

Access: Take one train from the major stationShinjuku in Tokyo until the end of the Keio Sagamihara line at Hashimoto (station KO45). Then take the Hashimoto 01 bus for Mikage to stop 14 at the base of the mountain called Tsukuiko Kanko Center mae (35.58643N, 139.280824E). Timetable and route is here. The summit is in the Kanagawa Kenritsu Tsukuikoshiroyama Park. Once starting the climb, there are maps available en-route. Summit at (35.5831N, 139.2787E) PM95PN. Blog by VK2IO.

JA/KN-017 Bukkasan 747m 4 points

Access: Take Odakyu line from Shinjuku up to Hon-Atsugi station – about 1.5 hours. From Hon-Atsugi go to through the north exit to bus stand 5 and take the bus for Miyagase 厚20 宮ヶ瀬行 市立病院前(本厚木駅発) Route name 厚木20 Atsugi 20 and get off at Bukkasan Tozanguchi 仏果山登山口. Alternatively take  a bus for Miyagase 厚21 宮ヶ瀬行 市内(本厚木駅発) route name Atsugi 21 from the same bus stand. This bus also stops at Bukkasan Tozanguchi. The walk to the summit takes 1.5 hours. Blog by JH0CJH. Track to summit is here.

JA/KN-006 Ooyama 1252m 8 points – in Tanzawa-Oyama Q-NP (JAFF-0050)

Access: Take Odakyu line from Shinjuku to Isehara station. From Isehara North gate take bus platform number 4. Take a bus for Ooyama Cable 伊10 大山ケーブル行 route number Isehara 10. From terminal station, take cable car to half way point then continue hiking. This mountain is famous for foreigners so you may find some English natives. Ask for “Ooyama Cable Car?” before boarding the bus. Summit at (35.440799713135, 139.23120117188).
Notes: Good location, very popular so huge number of people. Best to operate on the west side near microwave antenna tower otherwise it may become
difficult around lunch time.

Meiji Memorial Forest Takao Q-NP (JAFF-0049)

Blogs by JA1JCF and VK3ARR.

Chichibu-Tama-Kai National Park (JAFF-0005)

Mitakesan lies 3 or 4km northeast of Oodakesan JA/TK-007

Shizuoka area (JA2)

JA/SO-099 Takanesan 504m 2 points

Access: Route 52 north off Tomei Expwy then route 75 west then left after 600m up to summit. Parking inside activation zone.

JA/SO-120 307m 1 point

Access: off Shimizu Nihondaira Pkwy, Komagoe then walk up 200m. Blog by VK2IO.

Yamagata prefecture (JA7)

Zao quasi-National Park (JAFF-0044)

Access: The Zao Onsen skiing area is within the National Park. Area map is here and the park is marked in purple on p.10 lower right.
Blog by JA7IC.

Akita prefecture (JA7)

JA/AT-001 Komagatake (Onamedake) 1637m, 10 points – in Towada-Hachimantai NP (JAFF-0027)

Access: From Tazawako station take Akita Komagatake line bus to the end at “8th Stage of Akita Komagatake”. Walk 1.5 hrs to summit. Open between June 1 and October 31.

Hokkaido (JA8)

JA8/SB-005 Nisekoannupuri 1308m, 8 points

Access: In winter this summit can be accessed from the top chairlift at the Niseko Annapuri ski resort. This lift (and lower lifts) are only open during favourable weather and for a few hours around the middle of the day. Take Jumbo Pair lift #4 and go through Gate 2 and climb up to the south peak. Then walk north a further 400m to Annupuri. No trees here so bring your own squid pole. The AZ is within JAFF-0036 Niseko-Shakotan-Otaru Kaigan Quasi-NP.


Additional resources

Cluster in Japan for posting local activations: http://qrv.jp/

Beacon monitor for daily  band conditions: http://ayoko.net/faros/

Japan Century Cities awards program: JCC

WWFF logs should be sent to logs@wff-dl.de as there is no local coordinator. 44 contacts need to be made as there are no JAFF awards yet.

JAFF park maps tend to be in Japanese. As a guide, use the Protected Planet site and search for the park to find a map in English with the park boundary.

Thanks for contributions from: Gou JA1SWI, Toru JH0CJH, Nobi JA1JCF, Andrew VK3ARR

SOTA first activation of Udoyama JA/SO-120 – 14 Feb 2016

As part of my 2016 Japan trip I travelled to Shizuoka, 180km and about 3 hours drive south of Tokyo. I activated Udoyama JA/SO-120 for the first time with help from my friends Yoshi JG1VOZ and Hiro JA2LXT. This summlt is more accessible to Shizuoka city than Takanesan JA/SO-099 previously considered. Near JA/SO-120 there is a peak and lookout with a TV tower called Nihondaira Prefectural Natural Park and we went there first only to find ourselves 300m away from the real peak. I dare say it would not have been in the Activation Zone either. One must continue on the Shimizu Nihondaira Parkway to (34.9749, 138.4695) and then drive up a rough track 300m and then walk up a steep muddy track 200m to the summit with some bush bashing. The summit is marked with a tag saying 307m and is at (34.973099, 138.4697), locator PM94FX.

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Shack on Udoyama JA/SO-120

The summit is overgrown with lots of trees. I used a linked ground plane and threw the end of the antenna over a tree. On 20m I made four VK/ZL SSB contacts and three VK on CW using the callsign JR2YFM/2. On 40m CW I made four local contacts. Ended up with more contacts than at Shiroyama JA/KN-022 in less time. I was able to stay on 3 Watts throughout the one hour activation. One contact was a S2S with Takeshi JS1UEH at JA/IB-006 on 40m – my first for JA. This was also a first activation of Udoyama JA/SO-120.

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Rig and log book on Udoyama JA/SO-120

Thank you for all the contacts and for those that chased. One discovery via SOTAwatch was that 7032 is used for RTTY in Japan. When 40m is open to JA from VK it may be better to stay below 7032.

There is a short video from this activation here.

My first SOTA activation in Japan – Shiroyama 13 Feb 2016

The first SOTA summit I climbed during my visit to Japan was Shiroyama JA/KN-022. This summit is on the western outskirts of Tokyo and just over the border into Kanagawa prefecture. And climb it was as the bus drops you off a little above sea level. The summit is at 375m elevation rising up steeply from the flatlands of Tokyo.

Public transport to the summit is very convenient. Take one train from the major station Shinjuku in Tokyo until the end of the Keio Sagamihara line at Hashimoto (station KO45). Then take the Hashimoto 01 bus for Mikage to stop 14 at the base of the mountain called Tsukuiko Kanko Center mae (35.58643N, 139.280824E). Timetable and route is here. Once starting the climb, there are maps available en-route.

Near the top there is a faux-peak with a small shrine. One then walks down a little and up again to the real peak which has a cleared area at the top (35.5831N, 139.2787E). I set up just to the side of this clearing.

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My station consisted of a linked ground plane antenna that I had made that day after scouring Akihabara for parts. It had links for 40m, 20m, 15m and 10m. The radials were designed for 20m. A tree provided the top support for the vertical section of the ground plane.

The radio used was the KX3 on internal AA alkaline batteries.With such a small power source the radio could only be used QRPp and I started out at 3 Watts. With the 6m/10m SOTA challenge in its last day, I set up on 10m at first.On SSB I was rewarded with 5 contacts: JJ1SWI/1, VK4RF, VK4HA, JA1JCF and 7K1WRK/1. I tried CW too but made no contacts in that mode. Callsign used was JR2YFM/1. QTH locator: PM95pn.

Lowering the vertical, I joined up the first pair of wires and was then on 15m. On that band I made one contact with JJ1SWI/1 again. The radio was starting to shut down during transmit occasionally so I had dropped the power to 2 Watts. Seemed unusual to only have one call on 15m, however, there may have been no propagation. JJ1SWI is local to Tokyo so it was a ground wave contact.

Next was 40m and two more links were joined in the antenna. On this band there was another call from JJ1SWI/1 at about the same strength as on the other two bands. I had reduced my power down to 1 Watt at this stage.

For the final change it was to 20m CW and after dropping the antenna and removing a link I was rewarded with a call from Rick VK4RF and his alter-ego VK4HA. Sigs received on this band were 58 from Rick so quite a bit stronger than on 10m. The difference was that I worked Rick using 3W on 10m but only 1W on 20m.

With little battery left and the light fading fast I had to pack up quickly and drop down the mountain. It took about 30 mins to climb to the top and about 20 mins to descend. With a 3 minute wait for the bus I was on my way back to Tokyo. Allow 90 mins to get to Shinjuku station.

So, a very successful activation. Although I made 4 contacts on CW, there were only 3 unique stations so I am yet to qualify on CW. I well and truly qualified on SSB. This is a very easy one to activate if you are in Tokyo as the public transport is so convenient. The only difficult thing is the climb. Remarkably, there is no QRM at the top of the mountain. Nice views of the dam and countryside below too.